Vintage Wooden Aircraft - Page 2


Sopwith Schneider / Tabloid - Rare c.1934 SKYBIRDS pre-war model – wooden with metal parts -1/72 scale

A pre-war (c.1934) original wooden/metal Skybirds model of the Sopwith Schneider Float plane of WW1.

At 1/72 scale, airframe is solid wooden, with metal struts etc. in the usual Skybirds fashion.....the Schneider has a wingspan of around 4 inches (10.5cms) and is in complete condition, not bad for an 80 years old model !

The Sopwith Tabloid and Sopwith Schneider were British biplanes, originally designed as sports aircraft and later adapted for military use. They were among the first types to be built by the Sopwith Aviation Company.

Sopwith developed this floatplane in 1914 to enter in the Schneider Trophy international seaplane race. Its design was based on the Tabloid, a compact sports and racing biplane. Flown by Howard Pixton, the Schneider won easily, setting a new seaplane speed record of 92mph (148km/h).

The Tabloid was one of the first biplanes to outperform monoplanes, such as the Blériot XI, and was adopted for use in World War One. Tabloids were used as scouts and bombers, while Schneiders were used for naval patrols and home defence.

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Westland Wallace – c.1934 SKYBIRDS pre-war model – wooden with metal parts -1/72 scale

RESERVED - ALAN

A pre-war (c.1934) original wooden/metal Skybirds model of the Westland Wallace.

At 1/72 scale, airframe is solid wooden, with metal undercarriage etc. in the usual Skybirds fashion.....this Wallace has a wingspan of around 8 inches (20 cms) and, although a little “tired” ….is in generally complete condition, and a good candidate for some gentle restoration......hence the price !


The Westland Wallace was a British two-seat, general-purpose biplane of the Royal Air Force, developed by Westland as a follow-on to their successful Wapiti. As the last of the interwar general purpose biplanes, it was used by a number of frontline and Auxiliary Air Force Squadrons.

The original PV-6 prototype G-ACBR , also known as the Houston-Wallace, along with G-ACAZ, was part of the Houston Everest Expedition, named after Lucy Lady Houston, the patron, an attempt to fly over Mount Everest. Both aircraft received modifications that included fitting heating and oxygen equipment, fully enclosing the rear cockpits and using highly supercharged Bristol Pegasus IS 3 engines. Flown by Fl.Lt D.F. McIntyre and Douglas Douglas-Hamilton, otherwise known as Lord Clydesdale, the two aircraft became the first to fly over Mount Everest on 3 April 1933.

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Blackburn Shark - c.1934 SKYBIRDS pre-war model – wooden with metal parts -1/72 scale

A pre-war (c.1934) original wooden/metal Skybirds model of the Blackburn Shark Torpedo Bomber of the late 1930's and early WW2.

At 1/72 scale, airframe is solid wooden, with metal undercarriage, copper exhausts etc. in the usual Skybirds fashion.......it has a wingspan of around 8 inches (20 cms) and is in generally complete & good condition.


The Blackburn Shark was a British carrier-borne torpedo bomber built by the Blackburn Aircraft company in England and was the last in a series of Blackburn produced biplane torpedo bombers that equipped the Fleet Air Arm in the inter-war years.

The Shark I entered service with No.820 Squadron on HMS  Courageous in May 1935, replacing the Fairey Seal. The Shark II followed early in 1936, equipping No.11 (Fighter) Group at Gosport and No.821 Squadron, also on the  Courageous. Other Sharks operated as catapult aircraft on the battlecruiser Repulse and the battleship Warspite. No.822 Squadron received the Shark in 1936, and No.810 in 1937.

In the following year the Shark was phased out of service in favour of the Fairey Swordfish. A number of the surviving aircraft were then converted into target tugs while others were used as training aircraft, remaining in use in this role into 1942.


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SPAD S.VII R.F.C. - c.1934 SKYBIRDS pre-war model – wooden with metal parts -1/72 scale

A pre-war (c.1934) original wooden/metal Skybirds model of the French SPAD S.VII of WW1 finished in the colours of the Royal Flying Corps.

At 1/72 scale, airframe is solid wooden, with metal undercarriage etc. in the usual Skybirds fashion.......it has a wingspan of just over 4.25 inches (11 cms) and is in generally complete & good condition.

The SPAD S.VII was the first of a series of highly successful biplane fighter aircraft produced by Société Pour L'Aviation et ses Dérivés during the First World War. Like its successors, the S.VII was renowned as a sturdy and rugged aircraft with good climbing and diving characteristics.

Apart from the Aviation Militaire (French Air Service) The Royal Flying Corps was the first foreign service to receive the SPAD VII, although only two squadrons (19 & 30 Squadrons) used it on the Western Front. In addition, fighter schools in the United-Kingdom and Squadrons in Mesopotamia also received SPADs.

British-built SPADs were generally used in the training units and in the Middle East, while fighting units in France used superior French-built models.

When the United States entered the war in 1917, an order for 189 SPAD VIIs was placed for the United States Army Air Service of the AEF. The first aircraft were delivered in December 1917. Most were used as advanced trainers to prepare the American pilots for the SPAD XIII.

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