Vintage Wooden Aircraft


LVG C.V – Very rare c.1934 SKYBIRDS pre-war model – wooden with metal parts -1/72 scale

A pre-war (c.1934) original wooden/metal Skybirds model of the LVG C.V of WW1.

At 1/72 scale, airframe is solid wooden, with metal undercarriage etc. in the usual Skybirds fashion.....this LVG has a wingspan of around 7 inches (17.5 cms) and is in complete condition, not bad for an 80 years old model.

The LVG C.V was a reconnaissance aircraft produced in large numbers in Germany during World War I.

The C.V was a general purpose 2 seat reconnaissance aircraft built by Luft Verkehrs Gesellschaft (LVG) It entered service in 1917, ultimately being produced and fielded in large numbers across the Western Front, Although classified as a reconnaissance Aircraft, the C.V combination of 2 crew, offensive/defensive armament and excellent performance allowed it to evolve into quite a lethal fighter platform.

Following the war, some C.Vs were used as civil transports, while some 150 machines captured by Polish forces were put to use by the Polish army.

Other post-war users included Russia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia; together operating about 30 aircraft.

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Sopwith Camel – Rare c.1934 SKYBIRDS pre-war model – wooden with metal parts -1/72 scale

A pre-war (c.1935) original wooden / metal Skybirds model of the Sopwith Camel.

The airframe is solid wooden, with metal undercarriage etc. in the usual Skybirds fashion.....and at 1:72 scale, this Camel has a wingspan of around 4.5 inches (12cms) and is in complete condition, not bad for an 80 + years old model !


The Sopwith Camel was a British First World War single-seat biplane fighter aircraft introduced on the Western Front in 1917. It was developed by the Sopwith Aviation Company as a successor to the earlier Sopwith Pup and became one of the best known fighter aircraft of the war.

Though proving difficult to handle, it provided for a high level of manoeuvrability to an experienced pilot, an attribute which was highly valued in the type's principal use as a fighter aircraft. In total, Camel pilots have been credited with the shooting down of 1,294 enemy aircraft, more than any other Allied fighter of the conflict. Towards the end of the First World War, the type had also seen use as a ground-attack aircraft, partially due to it having become increasingly outclassed as the capabilities of fighter aircraft on both sides were rapidly advancing at that time.

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Fiat G.80/82 – Period wooden/metal contractor model 1:50 scale – with original multi pose aluminium stand c.1952 very rare

A rare model of an equally rare aircraft !

The Fiat G.80/82 was a military jet trainer developed in Italy in the 1950s, and was that country's first true jet-powered aircraft. It was a conventional low-wing monoplane with a retractable tricycle undercarriage and engine air intakes on the fuselage sides. The pilot and instructor sat in tandem under a long bubble canopy. 

The G.82 was a refined version of the original G.80 developed for entry in a NATO competition to select a standard jet trainer, and had a Rolls Royce Nene engine replacing the previous Goblin. Only 5 aircraft were completed and the programme was terminated. The G.82's that had been built were used by the Aeronautica Militare for a few years before being handed over to the Reparto Sperimentale Volo (Dept.of Experimental Flight) in 1957.


This vintage “Cold War” contractor model is constructed mainly from wood, but the fuselage spine running from the rear of the glazed cockpit to the tail is metal. Underneath is fitted a brass universal joint ball, so that when the aircraft is located onto the aluminium stand, it can be posed at any angle.

The wingspan is around 9 inches (23 cms) which makes it around 1:50 scale.


The airframe is good, straight and undamaged, the original canopy is clear and undamaged.......and with only 5 of the real aircraft completed, this is a very rare model indeed....


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Handley Page Victor – Solid wooden model & display stand - 11 inch Span

A solid wooden model, not new, probably one of the smaller solid models manufactured by Bravo Delta / Pacific Aircraft Models and about 15 years old.

Wingspan is around 11 inches (29cms) and the condition is generally very good, with evidence of just one paint chip that has been touched in on the fuselage top.



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RESERVED - ALAN


Vickers Valiant – Scratch built wooden model & stand - 19 inch span

A well made and finished solid wooden model of the Classic Vickers Valiant...

The Vickers Valiant was a four jet high altitude strategic bomber and was the first, and most conservative in design, of the V-Bombers (the others being the Victor and the Vulcan). It served in pure bomber, photo-reconnaissance and tanker roles and was withdrawn from service in January 1965.

Age unknown, paintwork has a few scratches and abrasions, but it displays well. From the estate of a collector / model maker in Worcestershire, this model is quite nicely finished. The airframe is solid wood, the stand is wood and perspex.

The wingspan is around 19 inches (49cms) which I think makes it 1:72 scale.

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SKYBIRDS

The Air League of the British Empire (started in 1909) began a campaign to develop “air-mindedness” with its Empire Air Day program following the success of Sir Alan Cobham's 1932 National Aviation Day Campaign. A Junior Air League section was formed by A.J. Holladay, called the "Skybird League" in 1933, and the decision was made to market commercial solid-scale model kits of current model aircraft in 1:72 scale. These models consisted of solid wooden airframes, with beautifully cast metal engines, undercarriages, guns etc.

This was a purely commercial enterprise, but was the foundation of the later official War Department's Recognition Model program for the British.