Aircraft Recognition Models & RAF Stafford......a short introduction


RAF Stafford was a non-flying Royal Air Force station in Stafford, Staffordshire, England. Built in 1938, it was operational until 2006, as the home of no.16 Maintenance Unit, and also No 2 Mechanical Transport Squadron from 1958.

In April 2004 it was announced that units from RAF Stafford would be moved to RAF Wittering, effectively closing the station, and it officially ceased to be an RAF Station on 31 March 2006 and became Beacon Barracks operated by the Ministry of Defence.

16 Signal Regiment and 1 Armoured Division Signal Regiment moved there in 2015, although the RAF still maintain a presence in the form of the Royal Air Force Tactical Supply Wing. 

One of the most interesting (to enthusiasts) functions of RAF Stafford, was to act as the back up storage facility for both the RAF Museums at RAF Hendon and RAF Cosford. Some photos taken inside the 60,000 sq. ft. warehousing are shown below. It was estimated that some 80,000 plus items were held. At the time of the RAF moving out in 2004/6, it was decided to dispose of some of the excess items that had not been recorded onto the new data base. Something that fell into this category, was a number of original Wooden Aircraft Recognition models ! They were acquired locally and stored once more for about the last 10 years. Until being offered for sale by a leading Specialist Military Surplus supplier. We have managed to “Capture” a quantity of these.

Some will remain in my collection ! Others will be available over a period of months. They are ALL mint or very near mint, they have been stored in dry boxes for over half a century. Very few have labels (but most have swing tags) they were all “approval” models and there is only one of each aircraft. They include aircraft I have never seen as ID models, and some are very early. This forms the description of everything you will see on the following pages............


Boeing-Stearman Model 75 - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Stearman Model 75 is a biplane formerly used as a military trainer aircraft, of which at least 10,626 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s. Stearman Aircraft became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. 

Widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman or Kaydet, it served as a primary trainer for the USAAF, US Navy (as the NS and N2S), and with the RCAF as the Kaydet throughout WW2.

After the conflict was over, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civilian market. In the immediate postwar years they became popular as crop dusters and sports planes,

At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 5.5 inches (14 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,

Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost.


Vultee A-31 Vengeance - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Vultee A-31 Vengeance was an American dive bomber of World War II, built by Vultee Aircraft. A modified version was designated A-35.

The Vengeance was not used operationally by the United States, but was operated as a front-line aircraft by the RAF, the RAAF and the Indian Air Force in South East Asia and the South West Pacific. The A-31 remained in service with U.S. units until 1945, primarily in a target tug role.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 8 inches (20 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,

Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost. 


RARE - de Havilland D.H.89 Dominie – RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford


RESERVED - Alex

The de Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide was a 1930s short-haul biplane airliner developed and produced by British aircraft company de Havilland. Accommodating 6–8 passengers, it proved an economical and durable craft, despite its relatively primitive plywood construction.

When the European War began, 205 examples of DH.89 aircraft had been built. Many of them were pressed into British military service under the designation of DH.89 Dominie.

Typically used for passenger transport and radio navigation training, the British military ordered over 500 DH.89 Dominie aircraft with the more powerful Gipsy Queen engines.

To increase production, the firm Brush Coachworks Ltd. was contracted to build these aircraft as well, and this firm ended up building the larger portion of this contract. By the end of the war, 731 examples were built.

After the war, many DH.89 aircraft remained in service. The British Royal Air Force flew 81 of them as late as 1958, while many more were in service with commercial entities. Several are still in service at the time of this listing in 2019, some for recreational rides.

At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 8 inches (20 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost. 


Fairey Firefly - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford


The Fairey Firefly was a Second World War-era carrier-borne fighter aircraft and anti-submarine aircraft principally operated by the Fleet Air Arm. It was developed and built by the British aircraft manufacturer Fairey Aviation Company......In production from 1941 – 1955....


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 7 inches (17.5 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost.


Blackburn B-2 - V.Rare RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford

The Blackburn B-2 was a British biplane side-by-side trainer aircraft of the 1930s. Designed and built by Blackburn Aircraft at Brough.

The B-2 was aimed mainly at the military trainer market, and the prototype was shipped to Lisbon for evaluation, where it performed well in trials, although the Portuguese preferred a tandem layout and ordered the Tiger Moth instead.

Although not successful in competing for major military orders, the B-2 continued in production to equip civilian flying schools in the United Kingdom that were busy training pilots for the RA F under the RAF expansion scheme.with the B-2 equipping flying schools owned by Blackburn at Brough Aerodrome and London Air Park at Hanworth.

A total of 42 B.2's were built, including the prototype, with production continuing until 1937.

The last 3 built were sold to the Air Ministry and issued to the Brough Flying School where they were operated in RAF colours.

At the outbreak of WW2 the Hanworth aircraft were moved to Brough, where the 2 training schools merged becoming No.4 Elementary Flying Training School. The civilian aircraft retained their civil registrations, but had wartime camouflage, yellow undersides and RAF roundels added. All surving aircraft were handed over to the Air Training Corps as instructional airframes.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 5 inches (13cms)The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost.



Messerschmitt Bf 108 (RAF Aldon) - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Messerschmitt Bf 108 Taifun was a German single-engine sport and touring aircraft, developed by Bayerische Flugzeugwerke in the 1930s. The Bf 108 was of all-metal construction.

It was designed as a four-seat sports/recreation aircraft for competition in the 4 th Challenge International de Tourisme (1934)

Although it was outperformed by several other aircraft in the competition, the M 37's overall performance marked it as a popular choice for record flights. Particular among these traits was its low fuel consumption rate, good handling, and superb take off and landing characteristics.

The Bf 108A first flew in 1934, followed by the Bf 108B in 1935. The Bf 108B used the substantially larger, 12.67 litre displacement Argus As 10 air-cooled inverted V8 engine. The name Taifun (German for "typhoon") was given to her own aircraft by Elly Beinhorn, a well-known German pilot, and was generally adopted.

The RAF impressed four Bf 108s on the outbreak of World War II and put them into service, and designated them "Messerschmitt Aldon". It was the fastest light communications aircraft the RAF had ! . Postwar, 15 more captured Bf 108s flew in RAF colours.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 6 inches (15 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost.  


Percival Proctor - RAF Recognition model – 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Percival Proctor was a British radio trainer and communications aircraft of the Second World War, a single-engined, low-wing monoplane with seating for three or four, depending on the model.


The prototype aircraft first flew on 8 October 1939 from Luton Airport, and the type was put into production for the RAF and Fleet Air Arm. The prototype was tested as an emergency bomber during 1940 but this idea was abandoned as the invasion threat receded.


Although the first 222 aircraft were built by Percival at Luton, most of the remaining aircraft were built by F. Hills & Sons of Trafford Park near Manchester. They built 812 Proctors of several marks between 1941 and 1945, assembling most of the aircraft at Barton Aerodrome.


At the end of the war, many early mark Proctors were sold on the civilian market and were operated in Australia, New Zealand and Europe. The Mk IV continued in service with the RAF until the last was withdrawn in 1955.



At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 7 inches (17.5 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost. 


RAF STAFFORD MODELS ALREADY SOLD ARCHIVE