Aircraft Recognition Models & RAF Stafford......a short introduction


RAF Stafford was a non-flying Royal Air Force station in Stafford, Staffordshire, England. Built in 1938, it was operational until 2006, as the home of no.16 Maintenance Unit, and also No 2 Mechanical Transport Squadron from 1958.

In April 2004 it was announced that units from RAF Stafford would be moved to RAF Wittering, effectively closing the station, and it officially ceased to be an RAF Station on 31 March 2006 and became Beacon Barracks operated by the Ministry of Defence.

16 Signal Regiment and 1 Armoured Division Signal Regiment moved there in 2015, although the RAF still maintain a presence in the form of the Royal Air Force Tactical Supply Wing. 

One of the most interesting (to enthusiasts) functions of RAF Stafford, was to act as the back up storage facility for both the RAF Museums at RAF Hendon and RAF Cosford. Some photos taken inside the 60,000 sq. ft. warehousing are shown below. It was estimated that some 80,000 plus items were held. At the time of the RAF moving out in 2004/6, it was decided to dispose of some of the excess items that had not been recorded onto the new data base. Something that fell into this category, was a number of original Wooden Aircraft Recognition models ! They were acquired locally and stored once more for about the last 10 years. Until being offered for sale by a leading Specialist Military Surplus supplier. We have managed to “Capture” a quantity of these.

Some will remain in my collection ! Others will be available over a period of months. They are ALL mint or very near mint, they have been stored in dry boxes for over half a century. Very few have labels (but most have swing tags) they were all “approval” models and there is only one of each aircraft. They include aircraft I have never seen as ID models, and some are very early. This forms the description of everything you will see on the following pages............


RARE - de Havilland D.H.89 Dominie – RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford


RESERVED - Alex

The de Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide was a 1930s short-haul biplane airliner developed and produced by British aircraft company de Havilland. Accommodating 6–8 passengers, it proved an economical and durable craft, despite its relatively primitive plywood construction.

When the European War began, 205 examples of DH.89 aircraft had been built. Many of them were pressed into British military service under the designation of DH.89 Dominie.

Typically used for passenger transport and radio navigation training, the British military ordered over 500 DH.89 Dominie aircraft with the more powerful Gipsy Queen engines.

To increase production, the firm Brush Coachworks Ltd. was contracted to build these aircraft as well, and this firm ended up building the larger portion of this contract. By the end of the war, 731 examples were built.

After the war, many DH.89 aircraft remained in service. The British Royal Air Force flew 81 of them as late as 1958, while many more were in service with commercial entities. Several are still in service at the time of this listing in 2019, some for recreational rides.

At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 8 inches (20 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


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Hawker Hector - RAF Recognition model –1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

SOLD 

The Hawker Hector was a British biplane army co-operation and liaison aircraft of the late 1930s; it served with the Royal Air Force and saw brief combat in the Battle of France in May 1940. Some Hectors were later sold to Ireland. It was named after the Trojan prince Hector.

The prototype first flew on 14 February 1936, and one prototype and 178 production aircraft were built. 13 of these were supplied to Ireland in 1941–2.

Starting in February 1937, the Hector equipped seven RAF army co-operation squadrons, but began to be replaced by Lysanders from July 1938.The Hectors were transferred to Auxiliary Air Force squadrons. 613 Squadron were in the course of converting to Lysanders at RAF Hawkinge when they flew in support of the Allied garrison in the Siege of Calais. On 26 May, along with the squadron's Lysanders, six Hectors dive bombed German positions around Calais and on the following day, attempted to drop supplies to the troops, unaware that they had already surrendered; two Hectors were lost. The aircraft were then used by the RAF as target tugs, and ofr towing the Hotspur Training glider. .


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 6 inches (15 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


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Gloster Gladiator – RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – Rare 

SOLD

The Gloster Gladiator was a British-built biplane fighter. It was used by the Royal Air Force and the Fleet Air Arm and was exported to a number of other air forces during the late 1930s.

It was the RAF's last biplane fighter aircraft and was rendered obsolete by newer designs even as it was being introduced. Though often pitted against more formidable foes during the early days of WW2, it acquitted itself reasonably well in combat.

The Gladiator saw action in almost all theatres during the Second World War, with a large number of air forces, some of them on the Axis side. The RAF used it in France, Norway, Greece, the Defence of Malta, the Middle East, and the Anglo – Iraq War (During which, the Iraq Air Force also used Gladiators !)

Other countries deploying the Gladiator included China against Japan, beginning in 1938; Finland against the Soviet Union in the Winter War. Sweden as a neutral non-combatant (although Swedish volunteers fought for Finland against USSR as stated above); and Norway, Belgium, and Greece resisting Axis invasion of their respective lands.



At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 5.25 inches (13.5 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


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Blackburn B-2 - V.Rare RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford

The Blackburn B-2 was a British biplane side-by-side trainer aircraft of the 1930s. Designed and built by Blackburn Aircraft at Brough.

The B-2 was aimed mainly at the military trainer market, and the prototype was shipped to Lisbon for evaluation, where it performed well in trials, although the Portuguese preferred a tandem layout and ordered the Tiger Moth instead.

Although not successful in competing for major military orders, the B-2 continued in production to equip civilian flying schools in the United Kingdom that were busy training pilots for the RA F under the RAF expansion scheme.with the B-2 equipping flying schools owned by Blackburn at Brough Aerodrome and London Air Park at Hanworth.

A total of 42 B.2's were built, including the prototype, with production continuing until 1937.

The last 3 built were sold to the Air Ministry and issued to the Brough Flying School where they were operated in RAF colours.

At the outbreak of WW2 the Hanworth aircraft were moved to Brough, where the 2 training schools merged becoming No.4 Elementary Flying Training School. The civilian aircraft retained their civil registrations, but had wartime camouflage, yellow undersides and RAF roundels added. All surving aircraft were handed over to the Air Training Corps as instructional airframes.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 5 inches (13cms)The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


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Bücker Bü 133 Jungmeister - RAF Recognition model – 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Bücker Bü 133 Jungmeister was an advanced trainer of the Luftwaffe in the 1930s. It was a single-engine, single-seat biplane of wood and tubular steel construction and covered in fabric, it was first flown in 1935 by Luise Hoffman, the first female works pilot in Germany.

The Bü 133C racked up numerous victories in international aerobatic competition, and by 1938 was the Luftwaffe's standard advanced trainer.At the Brussels meet that year, a three-man Luftwaffe team made a strong impression on Reichmarschall Hermann Goring, who ordered a nine-man team be formed which dazzled the crowds at the International Flying meet in Brussels the next year.

At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 4 inches (10.5 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,

Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost. 

SOLD


Messerschmitt Bf 108 (RAF Aldon) - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Messerschmitt Bf 108 Taifun was a German single-engine sport and touring aircraft, developed by Bayerische Flugzeugwerke in the 1930s. The Bf 108 was of all-metal construction.

It was designed as a four-seat sports/recreation aircraft for competition in the 4 th Challenge International de Tourisme (1934)

Although it was outperformed by several other aircraft in the competition, the M 37's overall performance marked it as a popular choice for record flights. Particular among these traits was its low fuel consumption rate, good handling, and superb take off and landing characteristics.

The Bf 108A first flew in 1934, followed by the Bf 108B in 1935. The Bf 108B used the substantially larger, 12.67 litre displacement Argus As 10 air-cooled inverted V8 engine. The name Taifun (German for "typhoon") was given to her own aircraft by Elly Beinhorn, a well-known German pilot, and was generally adopted.

The RAF impressed four Bf 108s on the outbreak of World War II and put them into service, and designated them "Messerschmitt Aldon". It was the fastest light communications aircraft the RAF had ! . Postwar, 15 more captured Bf 108s flew in RAF colours.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 6 inches (15 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost.  


Heinkel He 51 - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Heinkel He 51 was a German single-seat biplane which was produced in a number of different versions. It was initially developed as a fighter, a seaplane variant and a ground-attack version were also developed. It was a development of the earlier He 49.

On 6 August 1936, six of the He 51s were delivered to Spain to fight in the Spanish Civil War along with the Nationalists. Initial operations were successful, with the Heinkels meeting and defeating a number of older biplanes of the Republican Air Force.

Deliveries continued as the hostilities increased, with two Nationalist squadrons equipped by November, and the Legion Condor forming three squadrons of 12 aircraft each manned by German "volunteers"

The He 51 continued in front-line service with the Luftwaffe until 1938, with it remaining in service as an advanced trainer for the first few years of World War II.

At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 6 inches (15 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost.

SOLD


Percival Proctor - RAF Recognition model – 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford – VERY rare

The Percival Proctor was a British radio trainer and communications aircraft of the Second World War, a single-engined, low-wing monoplane with seating for three or four, depending on the model.


The prototype aircraft first flew on 8 October 1939 from Luton Airport, and the type was put into production for the RAF and Fleet Air Arm. The prototype was tested as an emergency bomber during 1940 but this idea was abandoned as the invasion threat receded.


Although the first 222 aircraft were built by Percival at Luton, most of the remaining aircraft were built by F. Hills & Sons of Trafford Park near Manchester. They built 812 Proctors of several marks between 1941 and 1945, assembling most of the aircraft at Barton Aerodrome.


At the end of the war, many early mark Proctors were sold on the civilian market and were operated in Australia, New Zealand and Europe. The Mk IV continued in service with the RAF until the last was withdrawn in 1955.



At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 7 inches (17.5 cms) The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged,


Prices shown include Tracked/Insured Shipping, if your country or area are not shown, please contact me at the address shown on the CONTACT page for a competitive shipping cost. 


Curtiss C-46 Commando - RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford



SOLD

The Curtiss C-46 Commando is a low-wing monoplane with retractable landing gear originally derived from a commercial high-altitude airliner design. It was ultimately used as a military transport during World War II by the United States Army Air Forces as well as the U.S. Navy/Marine Corps. 

Usage continued for decades after its introduction.At the time of its production, the C-46 was the largest twin-engine aircraft in the world, and the largest and heaviest twin-engine aircraft to see service in World War II. The first C-46 flight took place on March 26, 1940, and by the time of first delivery to the Army Air Force in 1942, it had been named the "Commando".

Although 17 different variants of the airplane were produced, the C-46A and C-46F made up the bulk of the production run. A total of 3,140 Commandos were made before production ended in 1946.Initially, the C-46 was used to ferry cargo across the South Atlantic. The Army Air Force, Navy and Marines ultimately flew Commandos on all fronts in World War II, but they attained their fame flying material and supplies from India over the Himalayan Mountains, or "Hump" into China.They also towed gliders on raids behind enemy lines. In Europe, its first usage occurred late in the war when C-46s dropped paratroops during the crossing of the Rhine River in 1945.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is around 18 inches (47cms)The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged, and, unusually from this collection, has its stores stamps visible on the underside.


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Boeing 377 Stratocruiser - V.Rare RAF Recognition model – Wooden 1:72 scale - RAF Stafford - 2ft wingspan !

The Boeing 377 Stratocruiser was a large long-range airliner developed from the C-97 Stratofreighter military transport, itself a derivative of the B-29 Superfortress. The Stratocruiser's first flight was on July 8, 1947.

Its design was advanced for its day; its innovative features included two passenger decks and a pressurized cabin, a relatively new feature on transport aircraft. It could carry up to 100 passengers on the main deck plus 14 in the lower deck lounge; typical seating was for 63 or 84 passengers or 28 berthed and five seated passengers.

 Its reliability was poor, chiefly due to problems with the four 28-cylinder Pratt & Whitney R-4360 radial engines and structural and control problems with their propellers. Only 55 Model 377s were built for airlines, along with the single prototype.


At the standard British Recognition scale of 1:72, the wingspan is a little over 24 inches (61 cms)The Airframe is wooden, good and undamaged, and, unusually folr theses Stafford models, has the manufacturers label & Stores Reference – E.B.B 52/891



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RAF STAFFORD MODELS ALREADY SOLD ARCHIVE